Two Year Anniversary of danlovesguitars.com

187/365 - The Cake is Not a LieThe first post for danlovesguitars.com was published on July 9th, 2010. This is the second anniversary or if you prefer it is the danlovesguitars.com 2nd birthday.

I write this because I love guitars – and, mandolins and ukuleles and harmonicas – and blues, and jazz and music. I write about what I love and enjoy. Although I display affiliate links, after two years I haven’t earned enough for anyone to actually send me a check. I’m not doing this for the money. I am not trying to get your money. But I hope you find some of my articles useful and/or interesting.

So what have you read here? What’s been popular over the last two years? I’m going to review that now.

L1140282The most popular article of all times is Smaller than an ES-175I compare 8 hollow body archtop jazz guitars that are smaller than a Gibson ES-175. This continues to be a favorite article even though some of the guitars mentioned are no longer available new. In general, all of my articles on smaller sized guitars are popular. I’m not the only one who appreciates 000, 00, or parlor sized guitars or small archtops. You can browse my series on Small Guitars to see other articles on this subject. I recently added reviews of 2012 small jazz guitars, by manufacturer.

Martin & GIBZThe most popular article this past month, as well as this past week has been American Guitar Companies. It is the 3rd most popular article of all time. The article reviews the great american guitar companies and tries to explain, “Where are they now?” A recent article which is somewhat similar is American Instruments / American Music where I describe some of the contributions we (the United States) have made to music by inventing or perfecting instruments and musical genres. Both articles were Independence Day articles written to help celebrate America.

LumberThe second most popular article of all times is Traditional Woods for Acoustic Guitars. I give an introduction to woods used in guitars – what you should know if you’re trying to understand all the wood names and terminology. Another article in the same series which is in the top 10 is Unusual Guitar Materials. Guitars made of metal? Plastic? Yes and more. The series is What are guitars made. You can find that and all my other series by clicking on the Series menu (or here).

Other popular topics are humidity (e.g., How to Control Humidity and Calibrate a Hygrometer) and Modern Guitar Innovation with the three articles about resonator guitars being the most popular (Modern Guitar Innovations – 1927 – Tricone Resonator GuitarModern Guitar Innovations – 1928 – Single Cone Biscuit Resonator Guitar, and Modern Guitar Innovations – 1929 – Single Cone Spider Resonator Guitar).

Several of my favorite articles are among those already mentioned. I particularly like Unusual Guitar Materials. I also enjoyed researching Guitars named for Guitarists and Guitars with Names.

Finally, I can’t leave without mentioning my current infatuation, the Ukulele. So far I have two ukulele specific posts, The Ukulele and More Ukulele. Where to buy a guitar, mandolin, banjo, ukulele …? although generic, in fact was written because of my experience with a mandolin within the past year and my research on where to buy a ukulele.

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